East Harlem Giglio Society | Our History | Manhattan | New York City (NYC)
Giglio Society Member 2022
Jonharold Cicero -Jersey City, New Jersey
Giglio Society Member 2022
Alexandra Cocucci -Bronx, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Karen Messana-Cocucci -Bronx, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Paula Greco -Omaha, Nebraska
Giglio Society Member 2022
Nancy Rossi -Pelham, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Michael Velazquez -Southington, Connecticut
Giglio Society Member 2022
Kyle Wade -Hamden, Connecticut
Giglio Society Member 2022
Joseph Corrado -Closter, New Jersey
Giglio Society Member 2022
Matthew O'Bryan -Plainville, Connecticut
Giglio Society Member 2022
John Corrado -Cheshire, Connecticut
Giglio Society Member 2022
Joe Trapani -Sharon Springs, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
David Brai -Seymour, Connecticut
Giglio Society Member 2022
Robert Brai -Brick, New Jersey
Giglio Society Member 2022
Anna Donato -Monroe, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Joseph Saverino -Bronx, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Thomas Landrini -Bronx, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
LouAnn Landrini -Bronx, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Edie DiDomenico-Weber -Bronx, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Paul Ammirato -Bronx, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Mark Errico -Norwalk, Connecticut
Giglio Society Member 2022
Larry Trapani -Melville, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Doug Vitarelli -New York, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Carole Rizzo -Brooklyn, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Louie Carpino -Brooklyn, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Jack Rizzo -Brooklyn, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
Mariano Benzo -Tampa, Florida
Giglio Society Member 2022
JoAnn Coppola-Benzo -Bronx, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
JoAnna Esposito -Meriden, Connecticut
Giglio Society Member 2022
Janet Sinicola -New York, New York
Giglio Society Member 2022
John Petrizzi -Middle Village, New York

Our History

Our History

Around the turn of the 1900’s, Italian immigrants left Italy in search of a better life for their families. During this time, Southern Italy was a very desperate place holding little to no promise of a bright future for the many starving and hungry families. Many had no other choice but to pack up their belonging and take a chance on moving to the promise of the ‘New World’ – America!

Many families from the town of Brusciano, Italy migrated to East Harlem, NY to start new with other families and friends that came before them. Although these immigrants brought little with them on their 30-day long voyage across the Atlantic Ocean in the tight confines of the boat. What they did carry with them where their beloved traditions. For the people of Brusciano, this included their yearly Dance of the Giglio festival in honor of Sant’ Antonio.

It was around this time that the Italian immigrants of East 106th Street in East Harlem, decided to initiate their beloved tradition by building a Giglio and dancing it in the ‘New World’. The first Giglio Feast on 106th street in East Harlem started approximately 1908. Gioacchino Vivolo is credited for being the first Capo Paranza on 106th Street. He along with his brother Rocco Vivolo were members of the Bruscianese Society and were influential in bringing this tradition to East Harlem from Brusciano, Italy. The Festival on 106th Street grew for many years becoming one of the largest street fairs in America and remained that way until 1955. Then in 1957, the festival moved a few blocks uptown to 108th Street where the Dance of the Giglio continued until 1971.

After a 29 year hiatus, the Dance of the Giglio returned to East Harlem in 2000 as a Cooperative Feast with the Shrine Church of Our Lady of Mt Carmel that resides on 115th Street between 1st Avenue and Pleasant Avenue. The Festival enjoyed several great years dancing the Giglio during the Annual Feast of the Our Lady of Mt Carmel festival that takes place each year on July 16th, the feast date of the Madonna.

For the 2006 feast, it was decided to hold the Dance of the Giglio Festival separate from the Annual Our Lady of Mt Carmel feast. The Giglio is now danced in East Harlem on the second Sunday in August.

About

about-icon

The Giglio Society of East Harlem is a devoted group of individuals who have dedicated their lives to honor Sant’ Antonio.

READ MORE

Mission

mission-icon

East Harlem Giglio society is a diverse religious and cultural organization of Catholics.

READ MORE

COMMITTEE

committee-icon

The Giglio Society of East Harlem current Board of Directors, Capo Paranza’s, Lieutenants for our Giglio Boys and Girls.

READ MORE

In Memoriam

memoriam-icon

The Giglio Society of East Harlem living legends and first Capo Paranza’s.

READ MORE

LEARN MORE

Society News

Passing of Tom Granata 22 Feb '22

Passing of Tom Granata

We regret to inform you of the passing of Tom Granata at the age of 66 years. Husband to Susan Hartinger Granata, father of Olivia Finke, gr

READ MORE
Passing of Capo Anthony Repetti 07 Oct '21

Passing of Capo Anthony Repetti

We regret to announce the passing of East Harlem Giglio Capo Anthony Repetti Anthony was a life long Giglio Boy who was beloved by all. H

READ MORE